Veterans who work at Starbucks have something to say to those insisting the coffee company should hire veterans instead of refugees: “Check your facts, Starbucks is already there.”

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Veterans who work at Starbucks have something to say to those insisting the coffee company should hire veterans instead of refugees: “Check your facts, Starbucks is already there.”

Starbucks on Thursday posted a message from a group of employees who have served in the armed forces, responding to the furor unleashed by Chairman and CEO Howard Schultz’s pledge to hire 10,000 refugees over the next five years for its stores in 75 countries.

Schultz had outlined the plan Sunday in response to an executive order from President Donald Trump banning all refugee entry into the U.S. for 120 days, and barring entry to Syrian refugees indefinitely.

The announcement was greeted with cheers by some — and calls for a boycott by others, who said Starbucks should focus on hiring Americans.

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“We respect honest debate and the freedom of expression. Many of us served to protect that very right. Some of our brothers and sisters died protecting it,” the members of the Starbucks Armed Forces Network wrote in its message. “But to those who would suggest Starbucks is not committed to hiring veterans, we are here to say: check your facts, Starbucks is already there.”

Starbucks has hired 8,800 U.S. veterans and military spouses already as part of its pledge, in 2013, to hire 10,000 total by 2018, the company said.

The Starbucks veterans network, which has 14 chapters across the country, said that back in 2013, veterans already working at Starbucks asked the company to hire more service members and their spouses.

Since then, Schultz and his wife, Sheri, have visited military bases, used their personal wealth to help with plans for service members coming back from active duty, established military family stores at more than 30 bases around the country and encouraged Starbucks senior leaders to visit military bases, the message says.