A federal court judge in New York City affirmed a jury verdict that Costco owes Tiffany & Co millions for selling engagement rings labeled “Tiffany” that did not come from the famous jewelry company.

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A federal court judge in New York City affirmed a jury verdict that Costco owes Tiffany & Co millions for selling engagement rings labeled “Tiffany” that did not come from the famous jewelry company.

U.S. District Judge Laura Taylor Swain said Costco should pay Tiffany $11.1 million, plus interest, representing triple the jewelry company’s lost profit from Costco’s actions, plus $8.25 million in punitive damages awarded by a jury last October, according to Reuters.

The judge also barred Costco from selling products labeled as “Tiffany” unless they come from Tiffany & Co, or use the modifiers Tiffany “setting,” “set” or “style,” according to the Reuters report.

Costco said it will appeal the decision, calling the ruling “a product of multiple errors in pretrial, trial, and post-trial rulings.”

Tiffany & Co sued Costco in 2013, saying the rings were not Tiffany rings and alleging trademark infringement, counterfeiting, and deceptive business practices, among other things.

Costco argued that “Tiffany” is a generic term for a pronged ring.

The judge in the case rejected the argument in 2015, determining that Costco is liable for trademark infringement and trademark counterfeiting in its use of “Tiffany” on signs in the jewelry cases at its stores

Costco’s upper management “displayed at best a cavalier attitude toward Costco’s use of the Tiffany name in conjunction with ring sales and marketing,” Swain wrote, according to the Reuters report.

Costco said Monday that “this was not a case about counterfeiting in the common understanding of that word – Costco was not selling imitation Tiffany & Co. rings.”

A “small subset” of Costco’s signs had used the word “Tiffany” without the modifiers “setting” or “set,” Costco acknowledged — and the company “promptly changed its signs to omit all references to Tiffany,” Costco said in its statement. Costco also said the rings were not stamped with the Tiffany & Co name and were sold in plain beige and brown wooden boxes rather than the famous blue Tiffany boxes.

Reuters reported that Leigh Harlan, Tiffany’s general counsel, said in a statement: “We brought this case because we felt a responsibility to protect the value of our customers’ purchases and to ensure that Costco’s customers were not misled.”