Boeing continues to search for the stolen computer that contained personal data pertaining to thousands of current and former workers. But so far there...

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Boeing continues to search for the stolen computer that contained personal data pertaining to thousands of current and former workers.

But so far there are no indications that the information has been put to nefarious use.

“We still don’t see evidence of any data being used to commit fraud,” said Tim Neale, a Boeing spokesman.

The computer contained names and Social Security numbers for 161,000 current and former Boeing employees, and in some cases bank names, account numbers and routing numbers for employees who had their paychecks directly deposited into their accounts.

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“There’s literally thousands of employees who are aware of this now,” Neale said. None have reported problems with their bank accounts or other financial information since Boeing disclosed the theft Friday.

The chances of fraud occurring are diminishing, Neale added, as current and former workers who learn their personal information was on the computer have fraud alerts placed on their accounts.

Boeing and law-enforcement agencies continue to investigate the matter, so Neale said the company could not provide details about where or when the theft took place.

A Boeing employee who attended one of many internal briefings on the matter this week was told the computer was stolen the week of Nov. 7. That would place the theft at least a week before Boeing divulged it internally or externally. Neale declined to comment on the timing.

Representatives of the company’s TotalAccess service, which provides information on benefits and retirement plans, are meeting informally with workers at many Boeing facilities and continuing to provide updates online and by phone at 866-473-2016.

David Bowermaster: 206-464-2724