The home of Wall Street offers a unique resource for financial research through the Science, Industry and Business Library. Visitors are offered hands-on...

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NEW YORK — The home of Wall Street offers a unique resource for financial research through the Science, Industry and Business Library.

Visitors are offered hands-on investing seminars using the library’s computers and 100 databases. The library also has an online small-business resource center, supplemented by access to retired executives who volunteer advice to small-business owners, by appointment.

This week, the library got a flashy new “Business Information Wall” offering financial news and other breaking events from 17 screens.

The library, a branch of the New York Public Library, opened in 1996. It has made various efforts to stay relevant to the public by trying to become a magnet for individual investors and small-business owners.

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As a major research-and-circulation institution specializing in business and science, it is the largest public library of its kind in the United States, spokeswoman Jennifer Bertrand said.

In London, the British Library’s Business Intellectual Property Centre also offers a huge collection of market studies, online databases and financial news that makes it a research hub similar to the Manhattan library.

“This was an amazingly interesting problem to solve,” said Edwin Schlossberg, who with his ESI Design firm in Manhattan created the display of information in perpetual motion.

The challenge, he said, was to bring together intersecting business and nonfinancial-world news that can influence markets, in a setup beamed clearly from the flat screens spread across the wall. A wire-service news ticker streams across the top.

The background separating the images was designed using the luminous-light-emitting diode, or LED, technology on a translucent surface that allows the colors to flow from blue and green to purple and magenta.

The new high-tech resource, paid for by UBS bank, is not just news on fancy screens housed in a Madison Avenue building that was once home to the B. Altman department store.

The wall will give about 600,000 annual visitors to the library access to up-to-the minute market information for which commercial providers often charge fees.