The rush to chip away at BlackBerry's dominance in mobile-business e-mail intensifies further this week with Sprint introducing rival options from Good Technology and Seven Networks.

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The rush to chip away at BlackBerry’s dominance in mobile-business e-mail intensifies further this week with Sprint introducing rival options from Good Technology and Seven Networks.




Good, which last month signed on Cingular Wireless to sell its service, also said today it is adapting its software to work with corporate e-mail systems based on IBM Lotus Notes and Domino in addition to Microsoft Exchange.




Both the Sprint and Cingular arrangements drop the separate monthly charge for GoodLink on top of the carrier’s monthly fee of $40 or $45 per device for unlimited wireless-data usage.




Time Warner




CEO sees company as “consolidator”




Time Warner Chief Executive Officer Richard Parsons said his company is interested in buying more cable systems after agreeing in April to acquire assets of bankrupt Adelphia Communications.




“We want to continue to be consolidators,” Parsons said in an interview at Allen & Co.’s media conference in Sun Valley, Idaho.




After slashing debt, Parsons is turning to acquisitions as the company recovers from record losses that followed America Online’s $124 billion purchase of Time Warner in 2001.




Parsons cited Cablevision Systems as attractive.



Google



Arbitrator grants Internet name rights




The National Arbitration Forum (NAF) said Friday that Google has rights to the Internet domain names googkle.com, ghoogle.com, gfoogle.com and gooigle.com, which are similar to its own google.com domain.




The Web-search leader filed a complaint May 11, claiming legal rights to Web addresses bearing a close resemblance to google.com, which it registered in 1999.




Sergey Gridasov of St. Petersburg, Russia, registered googkle.com, ghoogle.com, gfoogle.com and gooigle.com between December 2000 and January 2001. He did not respond to charges levied against him.




NAF arbitrator Paul Dorf found Gridasov did not have rights to the Web addresses. Further, he found Gridasov used them to direct users to Web sites that attempt to download viruses and spyware. The domain names also carried links to products unrelated to Google, the NAF said.




Compiled from The Associated Press, Bloomberg and Reuters