Seattle-based F5 Networks said yesterday that Steve Coburn, its chief financial officer, plans to resign from the company in the next three months.

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Seattle-based F5 Networks said yesterday that Steve Coburn, its chief financial officer, plans to resign from the company in the next three months. The company said Coburn’s decision was based on personal reasons and that he has no immediate plans to seek other employment. Coburn joined the company in 2001.




F5 also confirmed its revenue and earnings targets for the current quarter, which ends June 30. It expects revenue between $70 million and $72 million and earnings ranging from 33 cents a share to 34 cents.




The news, released after the close of regular stock trading, disappointed investors. In after-hours trading yesterday, F5 stock fell $2.68, or 5.3 percent, to $47.88.



Yesterday, Agence France-Presse, the French news agency, said bloggers were not allowed to post terms to MSN Spaces such as “democracy,” “human rights” and “Taiwan independence.” Attempts to enter those words were said to generate a message saying the language was prohibited.




Sohn said heavy government censorship is accepted as part of the regulatory landscape in China, and Microsoft believes its services still can foster expression in the country.




Labor markets




Oregon’s jobless rate stagnant last month




Oregon’s seasonally adjusted unemployment rate was 6.5 percent in May, unchanged from April, according to Oregon Employment Department figures released yesterday.




Companies added 8,800 workers to their payrolls last month, but May typically shows an increase of 12,100 jobs across the state, translating into a seasonally adjusted loss of 3,300 jobs. That was the first decline since January 2004.




Washington state’s May jobs data are to be released today. Washington’s jobless rate rose to 5.5 percent in April from 5.2 percent in March.



Boeing



Helicopter project set with Sikorsky




A year after the Army scrapped its Comanche helicopter program, Sikorsky Aircraft and Boeing announced yesterday that they would again team up to bid on a new Air Force search-and-rescue helicopter.




Stratford, Conn.-based Sikorsky, manufacturer of Black Hawk helicopters, will design the HH-92 helicopter and Boeing Air Force Systems will design and integrate the flight systems.




Sikorsky recently lost a $6.1 billion contract to build the next generation of presidential helicopters.




Compiled from Seattle Times business staff and The Associated Press