A federal court is allowing two Starbucks Corp. managers to invite others who were similarly employed in the past three years to join their lawsuit that contends the coffee chain denied...

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FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. – A federal court is allowing two Starbucks Corp. managers to invite others who were similarly employed in the past three years to join their lawsuit that contends the coffee chain denied them overtime in violation of federal law.

The plaintiffs, Sean Pendlebury and Laurel Overton — managers at Starbucks stores in Broward County — were authorized last week by the court to ask others to join the suit. Starbucks will release the names of all its managers to the plaintiffs in the next month, said attorney Dan Levine, who represents Pendlebury and Overton.

Levine said it may take up to four months to send out notices of the suit to other past and current Starbucks employees who were managers and worked more than 40 hours a week. He said the effort has not been granted class-action status.

A message left for Starbucks officials was not immediately returned. In June, when the suit was filed, the company said it complies with all “applicable federal and state laws.”

The managers said they are paid salaries that are higher than what most hourly wage clerks earn, but estimated that less than 10 percent of their time was spent on managerial tasks — and that, they contend, does not make them exempt from overtime pay.

Pendlebury and Overton are seeking unspecified damages.

The Seattle-based chain with more than 8,700 stores worldwide reached a confidential $18 million settlement in another overtime suit by California managers who sued under state wage and hour laws in 2001.

On Monday, Starbucks shares slipped $1.84, or 3.1 percent, to close at $57.83 on the New York Stock Exchange. The shares have traded in a 52-week range of $32.93 to $64.26.