Highly sensitive personal data on 161,000 current and former Boeing workers is missing after the theft of a company computer.

Share story

Highly sensitive personal data on 161,000 current and former Boeing workers is missing after the theft of a company computer.

The data included “names and Social Security numbers, and in some cases birthdates and banking information,” according to a Boeing statement released Friday afternoon.

“The company has no evidence that any of the personnel-related data on the computer has been accessed or misused, and there was no classified, supplier, customer, engineering or material financial information on the computer,” Boeing said.

Roughly half of the people whose names were on the computer are current employees, with the rest retirees or former workers who have moved on to other companies, said Tim Neale, a Boeing spokesman.

Most Read Stories

Unlimited Digital Access. $1 for 4 weeks.

The computer belonged to an employee who was at an off-site location.

At the request of law enforcement agencies who are investigating the theft, Boeing declined to discuss the circumstances of the theft, including when, where and how it took place.

The worker was authorized to have the data on his computer as part of his job, Neale said. Neale declined to describe the exact nature of the employee’s duties at Boeing, but a company source said he worked in the human resources department.

Neale said that “In some cases, the names of banks and bank account numbers were listed. Boeing has such information for some employees because they have signed up for direct deposit.”

But no credit card or password information was on the computer, he said.

Boeing is contacting each person whose name was on the computer. Current workers received an e-mail message Friday from Rick Stephens, senior vice president of human resources, informing them of the theft and outlining services Boeing is making available to help safeguard their data.

“We are helping them enroll in fraud-alert programs at the three major credit monitoring agencies and additionally will pay for their enrollment in ongoing credit monitoring services if they choose to sign up,” Stephens said in the statement.