Starbucks was accused by the National Labor Relations Board of trying to prevent workers at three New York City stores from participating in union activities, The Wall Street Journal reported on its Web site late Friday.

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Starbucks was accused by the National Labor Relations Board of trying to prevent workers at three New York City stores from participating in union activities, The Wall Street Journal reported on its Web site late Friday.


In a Nov. 18 complaint, the federal agency says that Starbucks fired a worker who supported and assisted a union and that the company penalized other workers who supported union activities, the Journal reported. The article doesn’t state who the union was affiliated with or what the activities involved.


Starbucks spokeswoman Audrey Lincoff said the company doesn’t retaliate against workers who are interested in union activities and that termination policies are applied without consideration of union activities, the newspaper reported.


A hearing is scheduled for Feb. 7 before an administrative judge in New York, the newspaper said.


Nation and World

AIG

Ex-CEO may face


more civil charges


Additional civil charges against former American International Group (AIG) Chairman and CEO Maurice “Hank” Greenberg are possible, but no state criminal charges are expected, a spokesman for New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer said Friday.


On Friday, The Wall Street Journal reported that a person familiar with the matter said Spitzer is expected to add to his civil complaint against Greenberg as early as next week.


Spokesmen for Greenberg’s lawyer would not comment in the report.


Hollinger International

Black vows he’ll


show up for court


Fallen newspaper magnate Conrad Black says he will show up in Chicago next week to face fraud charges, which he called “one massive smear job from A to Z.”


Black, who made a brief appearance at a Toronto book launch, said he’ll “definitely” show up for his scheduled court appearance on Wednesday.


Black, 61, faces charges he defrauded the Hollinger International publishing empire he formerly controlled out of millions of dollars. Hollinger owns the Chicago Sun-Times and other publications.


Compiled from Bloomberg News and The Associated Press