New Year's resolutions often target personal goals or desires such as losing weight, quitting smoking or giving up chocolate. So it may be no surprise that the majority of workers...

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New Year’s resolutions often target personal goals or desires such as losing weight, quitting smoking or giving up chocolate.

So it may be no surprise that the majority of workers don’t make job-related resolutions part of their New Year’s ritual, according to a recent survey by temporary-staffing company Accountemps.

The poll revealed that 55 percent of workers reported that they never make resolutions regarding career, while 85 percent said they didn’t make one last year.

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Pamela Holland, co-author of “Help! Was That a Career Limiting Move?” published by Career Skills Press, says tapping into your passion is a sure way to create success for yourself.

“That’s the ticket to the future.”

She also says career-related New Year’s resolutions are a terrific idea.

For those unable to motivate themselves to make significant changes, such decrees present an opportunity to take stock and make some decisions that will advance you in the new year.

But Holland cautions that it takes more than resolve. “It takes the discipline of action.”

That starts with taking small steps.

She urges to first look at bad habits such as chronically showing up to work late, clicking a pen during meetings or not being prepared for meetings.

While small, such habits may annoy those around you and stir criticism.

Holland advises job seekers to seek the counsel of a trusted friend who will give honest feedback about grooming, wardrobe or posture — even something as simple as a good handshake.

She points to a recent survey of 1,000 employers that showed many of them were much more likely to overlook body piercing and tattoos than they were wimpy handshakes.

For those who feel their handshake may be lacking, Holland offers these tips:

• Business is gender neutral. Don’t wait for a woman to extend her hand or vice versa.

• A good handshake results in full contact. Don’t just grab the tips of someone’s fingers. It sends a condescending message to women “not to hurt the little lady.”

• Make sure your handshake has good strength but is not bone crushing. The hands should make “web-to-web” contact — the area where the index finger and thumb are joined — and give two to three pumps.

“It’s a little bit like a kiss,” Holland says. “You know when it’s over.”