Boeing and its biggest union said their bargaining teams were making good progress after the first week of intense contract talks, though the toughest issues remain on the table.

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Boeing


Boeing and its biggest union said their bargaining teams were making good progress after the first week of intense contract talks, though the toughest issues remain on the table.


Negotiations opened in June. A two-week round of final talks began Monday, when Boeing and leaders of the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers checked into the DoubleTree Hotel for talks beginning early every morning and dragging late into the night.


Boeing spokesman Charles Bickers said talks have been “purposeful and respectful.”


“We’re really building a solid foundation as we go forward,” Bickers said.


“All the subcommittees and the main table are continuing to meet, having good dialogue on the issues and exchanging proposals,” said union spokeswoman Connie Kelliher. Neither side would go into detail about exactly what was being discussed.

Wadia Group

Low-cost airline planned for India


India’s industrial conglomerate Wadia Group, best known for its textile brand Bombay Dyeing, will launch a low-cost airline in October and is in talks with Airbus and Boeing to buy 50 new jets over the next five to seven years, an official said yesterday.


The new carrier, GoAir, will operate with up to 22 used Airbus A-320 planes for the first two years, when deliveries of the new planes will begin, said Jeh Wadia, managing director of GoAirline.


Wadia declined to divulge investment details, but 50 new midsize aircraft typically cost $3 billion under list prices.

Qwest / CWA

Union workers set vote deadline


DENVER — The Communications Workers of America has set a Sept. 30 deadline for nearly 25,000 Qwest Communications employees to vote on a tentative contract agreement.


CWA District 7 officials are expected to begin meeting with local leaders across a 13-state region to discuss the terms of the contract, which calls for a 7.5 percent pay hike over three years, an eight-hour cap on mandatory overtime and some changes to health-care benefits.


The union and Qwest reached the agreement late Tuesday averting a potential strike.

Microsoft

Solution sought for browser defect


Microsoft was working yesterday to come up with a fix for a flaw in its Internet Explorer browser that could let hackers gain remote access to computer systems through malicious Web sites.


A patch was not immediately available, though some security experts played down the risk.


The vulnerability is a problem in the way Internet Explorer handles certain pieces of data that are optional components in various programs.


Microsoft said it knew of no customers who had been attacked.


Compiled from The Associated Press