The female executive whose affair with former CEO Harry Stonecipher led to his resignation has voluntarily left the company, Boeing announced in a memo to employees yesterday.

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The female executive whose affair with former CEO Harry Stonecipher led to his resignation has voluntarily left the company, Boeing announced in a memo to employees yesterday.

Boeing completed an investigation into whether the executive had misused any company resources during the affair with Stonecipher, the memo said. However, the company is not disclosing the outcome of that inquiry.

“By mutual agreement, neither Boeing nor the former executive is releasing further information,” the memo said.

The female executive, who was not named by Boeing, resigned as of Thursday. Though some media outlets have published the woman’s name, The Seattle Times decided not to do so out of regard for her privacy.

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An earlier investigation by Boeing into Stonecipher’s part in the affair concluded that he had made no improper use of expense accounts or company property and that he had not influenced the woman’s career or compensation.

Although Boeing business operations were unaffected by the relationship, the board ousted Stonecipher last week because of the potential impact on its image.

Insiders familiar with the board’s actions said that a series of explicit and graphic e-mails exchanged during the affair would have embarrassed the company if made public.

In the face of widespread initial skepticism about that explanation, insiders assert that there was no further hidden reason behind the board’s action.

Stonecipher’s wife filed for divorce days after news of the affair was made public.

A statement on the Boeing internal Web site yesterday said that the delay in resolving the status of the female executive was because action on Stonecipher as chief executive had to be dealt with first.

“Investigations of company officers such as the CEO take priority,” the statement said. “The Board of Directors is obligated to gather information and move as swiftly as possible in instances involving company officers whose employment status may have a material effect on the company.

“Investigative resources were applied first to the Stonecipher inquiry, then to the review of the actions of the female executive, who was not an officer of the company.”

The statement explained that the company had not released or confirmed the name of the woman “because Boeing tries to protect the privacy of current and former employees.”

The statement went on to warn that “any employee — whether an executive or nonexecutive — who provides unauthorized information (accurate or inaccurate) to the media” is violating company policy.

Boeing spokesman John Dern said that this policy was standard in many companies and that violations would be dealt with “on a case-by-case basis.”

Dominic Gates: 206-464-2963 or dgates@seattletimes.com