Of the approximately 3,000 employees eligible to vote, a total of 2,828 employees cast ballots, with 74 percent voting in support of the company.

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Workers at Boeing’s aircraft factory in South Carolina have voted against joining the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.

Of the approximately 3,000 employees eligible to vote, a total of 2,828 employees cast ballots, with 74 percent (2,097) voting in support of the company, according to a Boeing news release.

“We will continue to move forward as one team,” said Joan Robinson-Berry, vice president and general manager of Boeing South Carolina, in an email statement. “We have a bright future ahead of us and we’re eager to focus on the accomplishments of this great team and to developing new opportunities.”

Boeing waged an aggressive anti-union campaign in South Carolina, buying hundreds of local TV spots and deploying radio, billboards, YouTube videos, social media, emails and mailings to reach its employees.

The war of words between Boeing and the Machinists union began shortly after a renewed petition for a vote to organize production workers at Boeing South Carolina was filed.

In 2015, an attempt to organize the aircraft factory fizzled before a vote came to pass. The Machinists union at the time cited “an atmosphere of threats, harassment and unprecedented political interference.”

According to the federal Bureau of Labor Statistics, South Carolina has the nation’s lowest rate of union representation – 2.6 percent of employed workers. Since it is a right to work state where membership isn’t mandatory in a unionized workplace, the rate of union membership is even lower – 1.6 percent.

A Boeing executive said in 2010 that freedom from strikes and escalating wages was the overriding motivation for the company to place its new production line for 787 Dreamliners in South Carolina.

President Donald Trump is expected to be in South Carolina on Friday to attend the rollout of Boeing’s first 787-10, the new and largest model of the Dreamliner family.