Wal-Mart opponents could block the store if they successfully argue the store has an adverse impact on small businesses in the area or is not compatible with the community.

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SALEM, Ore. — A bill designed to let the city of Beaverton reject a proposed Wal-Mart because of its size is drawing concern from business lobbyists, who say the legislation could inspire other Oregon communities to seek special legislative treatment to get around land-use laws.

Wal-Mart opponents could block the store if they successfully argue the store has an adverse impact on small businesses in the area or is not compatible with the community.

The bill won approval this week from the Senate Environment and Land Use committee, with backers saying it would give residents some needed ammunition against Arkansas-based Wal-Mart, the world’s largest retailer.

Now, opponents can only fight the store because of how it will affect roads, sewers and other infrastructure.

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The two dissenters in the 3-2 committee vote were the panel’s Republicans, raising questions about the bill’s chances in the Republican-controlled House. The bill first moves to the Democrat-controlled Senate for a vote.

Wal-Mart has proposed a 149,000-square-foot store in Beaverton, which would become Washington County’s first Wal-Mart.

Associated Oregon Industries, which represented Wal-Mart at yesterday’s hearing, opposes the bill, said Julie Brandis, a lobbyist for the group. The bill could be the first of many that undermine agreed-upon standards, she said.

In addition, it discriminates against large retailers and is unnecessary because of the state’s existing land-use laws, Brandis said.