Wall Street rallied yesterday after Hurricane Katrina weakened, easing concerns about refinery outages along the Gulf of Mexico and pulling...

Share story

NEW YORK — Wall Street rallied yesterday after Hurricane Katrina weakened, easing concerns about refinery outages along the Gulf of Mexico and pulling oil prices back from record highs.

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 65.76 to close at 10,463.05. Last Friday, the Dow had its lowest close in seven weeks.

Microsoft, one of the 30 Dow stocks, added 18 cents to close at $27.15 a share. Boeing, also a Dow stock, gained $1.27 to $67.58.

The broader stock indicators also moved higher. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index gained 7.18 to 1,212.28, and the Nasdaq composite index rose 16.88 to 2,137.65.

Most Read Stories

Unlimited Digital Access. $1 for 4 weeks.

Stocks opened lower but quickly rebounded as crude-oil futures cooled after surging past $70 a barrel in early trading on news that the storm shut down about 8 percent of U.S. refining capacity. A barrel of light crude settled at $67.20, up $1.07 on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Investors found some relief in reports that President Bush was mulling whether to offset the supply disruption with oil from the nation’s petroleum reserve, but energy and insurance stocks still came under pressure as the market tried to gauge the hurricane’s financial impact.

Jim Dunigan, chief investment officer for PNC Advisors, said the market had braced for the storm and started looking elsewhere for direction after the Gulf Coast got “hit full force and survived.”

“It’s not likely this is going to have a significant impact on growth,” Dunigan said. “If it’s not going to have a significant impact on energy, we’re still in pretty good shape.”

Much of Wall Street’s advance came late in the day, when the hurricane eventually diminished to a Category 1 storm. With Katrina passing through the heart of the United States’ oil and gas infrastructure, the market weighed a spike in energy prices against the potential for long-term production outages. The storm forced the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port — the nation’s largest import terminal — to evacuate workers and stop unloading ships over the weekend.

“Clearly it’s going to have some impact on the market if there is damage that will keep [the port] closed,” said John Caldwell, chief investment strategist for McDonald Financial Group.