The Texas airline has just announced that it will accept Pay with Amazon on its onboard entertainment portal. That means the money will come from the credit card or other payment information registered on the passenger’s Amazon account.

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Southwest Airlines passengers who are also Amazon.com shoppers won’t have to dig out a wallet to pay for a movie, at least on airplanes equipped with Wi-Fi.

The Texas airline announced Wednesday that it will accept Pay with Amazon on its onboard entertainment portal. That means the money will come from the credit card or other payment information registered on the passenger’s Amazon account.

Southwest’s embrace of Amazon’s payment platform, which competes with Apple Pay and PayPal, is a big coup for the Seattle tech giant. Most of the businesses that have signed up to offer Pay with Amazon are mid-sized or small, although there are a few well-known brands, including Merrell footware and the Volkswagen Group of America.

Southwest, one of the largest U.S. carriers, flies more than 100 million passengers per year; the company says it has the largest fleet of Boeing planes on the planet.

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“Pay with Amazon makes it easy for millions of customers around the world to pay using their Amazon account,” said Patrick Gauthier, vice president, Amazon Payments, in a statement on a Southwest press release. “We are thrilled to be working with Southwest to offer customers a familiar and trusted way to pay while inflight to destinations all around the United States.”

Southwest passengers will be able to pay for Wi-Fi access, movies and messaging services with the feature.

It’s not the first time passengers will encounter Pay with Amazon in in-flight entertainment portals: Gogo, a company that provides connectivity and entertainment services to Alaska Airlines and other carriers, also offers the Amazon option.

Not all of Amazon’s experiments with payment have been successful. Amazon Register, a credit card reader for mobile devices launched in 2014 that rivaled a reader from Bay Area startup Square, was discontinued this month.

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